Pathways

The place God calls you to is the place where your deep gladness and the world's deep hunger meet. Fredrick Buechner

What if there was a well-defined process that purposefully and clearly guided people from a desire to make a difference to a place of meaningful service squarely aligned with the uniqueness of who they are?

Moving into 2017, Love Out Loud will be offering a new approach to serving in Winston-Salem/Forsyth County and surrounding regions built upon assessing gifts and passions, deepening the spiritual understanding of our volunteering and understanding the people who and contexts within which we serve.

While the program is still being fine-tuned, we invite you to take a first step in the process by giving us a glimpse of who you are! Take a few minutes to fill out the form below. We'll keep you posted on next steps. One of our team members will also follow up with you.

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Would you like to receive occasional text messages from Love Out Loud about serving opportunities in your area of passion/service?
Discovering Your Purpose *
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The Pathways team looks forward to walking alongside you in finding the best fit for you right here in our community. Here are a few thought-provoking resources that may be helpful in getting started, sparking your thinking and stirring your heart:

Stemming from the Idea's given in the book, "Toxic Charity," written by Robert Lupton. The idea of toxic charity is nothing new, but many still operate within these systems, not by any fault of their own. In his book, Lupton, identifies the elephant lurking in the room where most charitable giving, especially faith-based charity, takes place: it rarely results in real, sustainable long term change. The challenge for most individuals is to find the appropriate balance between helping someone or enabling systemic dependency behaviors which could result in the community as a whole suffering, or in laymen's terms; deciding when to help someone versus empowering them do for themselves.

Stemming from the Idea's given in the book, "Toxic Charity," written by Robert Lupton. The idea of toxic charity is nothing new, but many still operate within these systems, not by any fault of their own. In his book, Lupton, identifies the elephant lurking in the room where most charitable giving, especially faith-based charity, takes place: it rarely results in real, sustainable long term change. The challenge for most individuals is to find the appropriate balance between helping someone or enabling systemic dependency behaviors which could result in the community as a whole suffering, or in laymen's terms; deciding when to help someone versus empowering them do for themselves.

In Where the Cross Meets the Street Castellanos shows the strengths and limitations of a narrowly focused church and broadens our imaginations to embrace a gospel that proclaims Christ and forms disciples. This life-giving gospel also demonstrates compassion, confronts injustice and restores individuals and communities to wholeness. This is the whole work of the cross; this is the privilege of those who follow the Word made flesh.

In Where the Cross Meets the Street Castellanos shows the strengths and limitations of a narrowly focused church and broadens our imaginations to embrace a gospel that proclaims Christ and forms disciples. This life-giving gospel also demonstrates compassion, confronts injustice and restores individuals and communities to wholeness. This is the whole work of the cross; this is the privilege of those who follow the Word made flesh.

Churches and individual Christians typically have faulty assumptions about the causes of poverty, resulting in the use of strategies that do considerable harm to poor people and themselves.  Bestseller When Helping Hurts articulates a biblically based approach to poverty alleviation.  This book seeks to equip churches and individuals to walk alongside people who are poor, breaking the spiritual, social, and material bonds of poverty.

Churches and individual Christians typically have faulty assumptions about the causes of poverty, resulting in the use of strategies that do considerable harm to poor people and themselves.  Bestseller When Helping Hurts articulates a biblically based approach to poverty alleviation.  This book seeks to equip churches and individuals to walk alongside people who are poor, breaking the spiritual, social, and material bonds of poverty.

Rolheiser probes the question “What is spirituality?”, cutting through the misunderstanding and confusion that can often surround this subject with clarity. Using examples and stories relevant for today, and with great sensitivity to modern challenges to religious faith, he explains the essentials of spiritual life, including the importance of community worship, the imperatives surrounding social action, and the centrality of the Incarnation, to outline a Christian spirituality that reflects the yearning and search for meaning at the core of the human experience. The Holy Longing translates the universal struggle for love and integration of spirit into a language accessible to all, explaining God and the Church for a world that more often than not doubts the credibility of both.

Rolheiser probes the question “What is spirituality?”, cutting through the misunderstanding and confusion that can often surround this subject with clarity. Using examples and stories relevant for today, and with great sensitivity to modern challenges to religious faith, he explains the essentials of spiritual life, including the importance of community worship, the imperatives surrounding social action, and the centrality of the Incarnation, to outline a Christian spirituality that reflects the yearning and search for meaning at the core of the human experience.
The Holy Longing translates the universal struggle for love and integration of spirit into a language accessible to all, explaining God and the Church for a world that more often than not doubts the credibility of both.


"Vocation is about a calling from God, from yourself, and from the world. Luther demanded that the concept of vocation be separated from ecclesiastical denotations-that is, he insisted that vocation is for all Christians, not just the clergy or members of religious orders. He insisted that God calls all Christians."
― Bradley Holt from Thirsty for God

 

Christ has no body now but yours,

no hands but yours,

no feet but yours.

Yours are the eyes through which

Christ's compassion must look out on the world.

Yours are the feet with which

He is to go about doing good.

Yours are the hands with which

He is to bless us now.

St. Teresa of Avila

 

Spirituality is not a law to be obeyed,
but a presence to be seized, undergone, and given flesh to.
― Ronald Rolheiser from The Holy Longing: The Search for a Christian Spirituality


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